High Vitamin K Food

High Vitamin K Food – What You Should Know

Being over 50 years old can cause vitamin K deficiency, which is a serious problem. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. It prevents excessive bleeding when injured.

Luckily, there are plenty of foods high in vitamin K out there for you to consume, and make sure you get your recommended dosage of this nutrient.

Below is a list of foods high in vitamin K, and why it is good for you.

Tofu (4 ounces) – 158mcg of vitamin K per serving

This food group contains a lot of calcium and protein. Tofu can be found in different varieties, which can make them easier to prepare for a variety of dishes. There are three different types of tofu in the market – freshwater, silken and firm tofu. These types can help reduce the risk of heart disease and perform the same functions as meat products. Also, tofu is an excellent source of iron, copper, selenium, phosphorus, and magnesium.

Spinach (1 cup) – 108mcg of vitamin K per serving

This green leafy vegetable is known to be high in iron and magnesium. Spinach is a good source of protein, vitamins A, C and E. It also contains calcium, potassium, manganese and zinc. One of the health benefits of spinach is that it can help reduce the risk of heart disease, which can take a toll on your health as you grow older. However, it should be noted that spinach has oxalates in it, which may contribute to urinary tract stones if consumed too frequently or in large quantities.

Collard greens (1 cup) – 91mcg of vitamin K per serving

This leafy vegetable is an excellent source of vitamins A and K. It also contains plenty of fiber, calcium, iron, potassium as well as vitamins A and C. Collard greens can be used to make soup and sautéed in a tasty dish.

Cranberries (2 slices) – 78mcg of vitamin K per serving

This fruit is an excellent source of vitamin D, E, and K. This fruit can help reduce the risk of heart disease, osteoporosis as well as cancer. It can also help prevent urinary tract infections and strengthen the immune system. One of the health risks of consuming this fruit is that it can be hard for some people to digest due to its high fiber content. It may also cause diarrhea if consumed in large quantities.

Avocado (1 cup cubed) – 62mcg of vitamin K per serving

This food is a good source of vitamins A, B, C, and E as well as potassium. Avocados are also an excellent source of fiber, iron, niacin, and folate. Avocados are a versatile fruit that is easy to digest. You can use it as a spread or dip or even use it in salads and desserts. But if you are planning to use it in a recipe, make sure that it has not been stored for too long so the avocado is still fresh and ready to be consumed.

high vitamin k food

Broccoli (1 cup) – 61mcg of vitamin K per serving

Broccoli is a good source of vitamins A, C, and E. It also contains plenty of fiber, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. This vegetable can be used in many ways like making soups or adding it to stir fry as well as steamed or roasted for a heartier meal. It also goes great with pasta.

Sweet Potato (1/2 medium) – 58mcg of vitamin K per serving

This is another tuber that is an excellent source of dietary fiber. It also contains vitamins A, B6, and C as well as potassium and calcium. It can be eaten in many ways like sliced into fries or baked. It can also be boiled and mashed so it tastes like a yam.

Spinach (1 cup cooked) – 56mcg of vitamin K per serving

Spinach is a good source of vitamins A, C, and E as well as fiber, iron, magnesium, and calcium. It can be eaten raw or cooked and is a great addition to salads.

Asparagus (1 cup cooked – 39mcg of vitamin K per serving)

This vegetable is an excellent source of fiber, protein, iron, folate, vitamin C, and potassium. It is a good source of vitamins A, B6, and manganese as well as magnesium and calcium. It can be steamed or boiled which makes it taste like a vegetable-based green bean. It goes great with scrambled eggs for breakfast or in pasta or even chicken for dinner.

I hope this article provided you with some knowledge on vitamin K and gave you some ideas about which foods to add to your diet.

Disclaimer: The information in this article is intended for educational and entertainment purposes only and should not be used instead of or contrary to that of a medical professional. Before taking supplements, starting a new diet, or embarking on a new exercise regime please consult a medical or nutritional professional. The owners of “Getting Healthy After 50” are not medical professionals and are simply redistributing information that is freely available on the internet. 

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